20+ Fall Statistics That Will Make You More Careful Today

According to fall statistics, falls happen so often that they’ve become a public health concern.

Unfortunately, it’s the elderly that’s slipping and falling mostly, which causes other health complications for them. Falls are also costly and painful, and unfortunately, can be the main cause of fatal injuries.

There are psychological consequences to be considered as well. Falls lower the quality of life for people. Half of them will do everything to prevent another fall, including not leaving the house.

Today you’ll learn more about how dangerous falls could be.

Facts & Numbers About Falls (Editor’s Choice)

  • Average medical expenses for falls are $50 billion per year in the US
  • According to elderly falls statistics, outdoor falls are most likely to occur among people younger than 75
  • Fall death rates increased 30% in the last nine years
  • 50% of falls create psychological consequences
  • Falls are 2nd leading cause of unintentional injury or death worldwide
  • 32.2% of people end up with sprains and strains if they fall down the stairs
  • 1st week of each fall is the fall prevention awareness
  • If trends continue to rise, there will be seven fall-related deaths per hour by 2030

General Falling Stats & Facts

Anyone can slip at any time and any place. While some people end up with a broken bone, many die from falls. The elderly and children seem to be the most endangered category, but unfortunately, many falls also happen in construction, where other generations have to deal with the lack of safety.

1. Over 80% of deaths due to falls happen in low and middle-class income countries

(WHO)

Western Pacific and Southeast Asia account for 60% of these fatalities. When it comes to all regions, death rates are highest among adults over 60 years of age.

2. Average medical cost of falls is $50 billion per year in the US

(CDC)

Medical costs related to non-fatal fall injuries are $50 billion per annum. $29 billion is covered by Medicare, $12 billion is paid out-of-pocket, and $9 billion is covered by Medicaid. These prices are likely to grow in the future due to the increase of people older than 65.

3. Fall death rates increased 30% in the last nine years

(CDC)

According to CDC fall statistics, fall death rates have increased by 30% in the last nine years. The increase was observed across 30 states, including the District of Columbia. The fastest-growing rate was noticed in adults aged 85 plus, at about 4% per year.

4. 157 out of 100,000 people die from falls in Wisconsin

(CDC)

Wisconsin is the state with the highest number of fatalities from falls, observed per 100,000 residents. CDC falls statistics also list Vermont, with 142, Maine, with 140, and Minnesota, with 124 deaths from falls. On the other end of the spectrum are Georgia, Alabama, Illinois, with the lowest number of fatalities, around 40 people per 100,000 residents.

5. If trends continue to rise, there will be seven fall-related deaths per hour by 2030

(CDC)

Since the fall death numbers are rising, we can expect to face seven deaths related to falls by 2030. Falls will become more life-threatening and more costly.

6. There are 3 to 11 hospital falls per 1,000 bed days

(NCBI)

According to patient falls in hospitals statistics, there are 3 to 11 hospital falls per 1,000 bed days, and it’s becoming an issue. Around 25% of these falls result in soft-tissue injury or fractures.

7. Stairways accidents cause 12,000 deaths per year

(Amstep)

This number only shows how dangerous staircases can get for both older adults and children. If they can’t be avoided, stairs should be used carefully to prevent accidents.

8. 1 million people suffer consequences of falling down the stairs

(Amstep)

The newest stair accident statistics suggest that about 1 million injuries are related to falling downstairs in the US. Every person will face different injuries based on their age, physical condition, and the severity of the fall. The most common injuries are sprains, fractures, spinal cord damage, lacerations, head and neck injuries, brain injuries.

9. Construction fall statistics show that 51% of all falls in the US are construction falls

(Bigrentz, CDC)

The most recent data suggests that the construction site is a dangerous place to be without proper safety standards in place. Almost 3 out of 10 non-fatal injuries in construction are related to slips, trips, and falls.

10. American Indian and Alaskan Natives fall the most – 32%

(CDC)

Falls seem to vary by race. American Indian and Alaskan Natives have the highest percentage of falls, 32%. Asian and Pacific Islanders fall the least, with 16% of reported falls.

Elderly Fall Statistics

Even though nobody is safe from falling at least once in their lifetime, seniors may be the most endangered category. It’s not only that the fall causes harm; it also threatens safety, independence, and finances.

11. Outdoor falls are most likely to occur among people younger than 75

(WHO)

According to the elderly fall risk statistics, outdoor falls are likely to happen to those younger than 75. This age group is more mobile and more active. Indoor falls happen to people 75 and older since they’re frailer and mostly stay indoors.

12. Almost ⅓ of adults aged over 65 experience falls in their home

(Healthinaging)

The inside of the house seems to be the most common place to fall. According to the falls in the home statistics and numbers, an older person falls every second. Each year, ⅓ of adults aged over 65 experience falls in their homes. Unfortunately, many of them will fall once more in their life.

13. Every 11 seconds, an older adult is treated for fall-related injuries

(NCOA)

Falls are so common that new cases happen many times per minute. According to the fall statistics in elderly population, an older adult visits the emergency room to treat fall-related injuries every 11 seconds; every 19 minutes, one person dies from the consequences. It’s no wonder that falling is considered an epidemic.

14. 50% of falls have psychological consequences

(Aging)

Unfortunately, falls don’t leave only bruises or fractures. They also leave negative psychological consequences. 50% of falls leave people in fear of falling again. That’s why many decide to stay away from social activities and not bear any risks, as the fall statistics indicate.

15. Knee pain doubles the risk of falls in elderly population

(Bmcgeriatr.biomedcentral)

A recent study on knee pain concluded that alleviating knee pain can help minimize the risk of falls in elderly population since the presence of knee pain doubles the chances for falls.

Fall Injury Statistics

Many injuries happen when a person falls. How severe the damages will depend on the type of fall, age, physical fitness, and other factors.

16. Falls are the second leading cause of unintentional injury or death worldwide

(WHO)

Falls seem to be a global problem since almost 646,000 falls happen per year. They’re the second leading cause of accidental and unintentional injury or death, right after road traffic accidents.

17. At least 300,000 older people per year are hospitalized for hip fractures, according to elderly falls statistics

(CDC)

More than 95% of hip fractures happen because of sideway falls. Three-quarters of women fall more often than men and end up with all hip fractures or other non-fatal injuries.

18. 32.2% of people end up with sprains and strains if they fall down the stairs

(Amstep)

Sprains and strains are the most common injury after falling down the stairs. Other injuries include head and neck injuries, 21.6%, and fractures, 19.3%.

19. More than 37 million falls require medical attention, falls statistics show

(WHO)

These falls are the reason for over 17 million disability-adjusted years lost (DALY). DALY represents a measure of disease burden. It’s expressed as the number of lost years due to poor health, disability, or premature death, including the ramifications of falls. Since they are way more common than people believe, it’s no wonder that they’re considered to be a problem, both globally and in the US.

Fall Prevention Statistics & Facts

Even though falls can be extremely dangerous, there are ways to prevent them from happening. When it comes to the older generation, they should focus on altering their environment and making their homes fit their needs. The workforce that’s at risk should follow the guidelines and use proper PPE.

20. Six ways to prevent falls include adding support to the bathroom and installing additional lights

(Stopfalls)

There are many ways to make the home safer for people who have an increased risk of falling and minimising fall risk statistics.

The six most commonly recommended methods include keeping the pathways clear, remembering uneven surfaces, keeping the frequently used items close, adding lighting and support to the bathroom, and being careful with stairs.

Changing one’s home and removing hazards can mitigate the risks of falling and provide a healthier environment for the elderly.

21. Over 70 national organizations are working with Falls Free Initiative

(NCOA)

Since statistics for falls in the elderly clearly show how dangerous falls are for the elderly population, people have created the Initiative to help with fall prevention. The members are educating elderly population, dealing with funding, and creating programs to reduce the risk of falling.

22. The first week of each fall is the fall prevention awareness

(Stopfalls)

Falls cause many issues among adults, and that’s why Fall Prevention Awareness Week is used to spread the message that falls are preventable. Fall prevention coalitions, healthcare providers, senior service agencies, and many others are spreading the word on fall protection facts to elderly residents, their families, and caregivers to help prevent falls.

23. General Industry Walking-Working Surfaces and Fall Protection Standards can prevent over 5,800 injuries every year

(OSHA)

When it comes to the working population in the US, they too are in danger of fall-related injuries. The latest update to the General Industry Walking-Working Surfaces and Fall Protection Standards will increase fall protection and change the statistics by preventing more than 5,800 injuries and almost 30 fatalities yearly.

Summary

Falls are a global issue. At least 300,000 older people are hospitalized for hip injuries, and many don’t survive them. That’s why falls are the second leading cause of unintentional injury or death, right after road traffic accidents.

Women seem to fall more than men and end up with a hip fracture or other injuries. According to fall statistics, 50% of people who had a fall will feel the need to stay away from activities and minimize the risk of falling again.

Luckily, there are ways to prevent falls, such as minimizing the movement around the home, keeping the necessities nearby, installing additional lighting and handles in the bathroom, and walking down the stairs carefully. Life without falls may seem impossible, but with extra care, the risks can be lowered.

Frequently Asked Questions

What percentage of falls happen at home?

The inside of the house seems to be the most common place where the elderly population falls. One-third of people aged over 65 fall in their homes. This generation often finds it hard to move around, so they spend time inside. Unfortunately, many don’t work on securing their homes, even though it’s easy, and falls happen more often than they believe true.

What time of day do most falls occur?

It’s interesting to note that only 20% of falls happen during the night. Most falls occur during the day when people are actively moving. Those falls that happen during the night most commonly happen between 9 PM and 7 AM, when older people wake up to use the toilet. Falls that happen during the day can happen anywhere but are most likely to happen to younger generations outside the house.

How many die from falls each year?

Each year, more than 646,000 individuals die from falls all over the world. Adults are most likely to suffer from fatal injuries. 33.7 million people require medical attention each year because of falls. There are over 2.8 million people in the ER per year in the US, treating fall-related injuries. 27,000 US residents die from falls.

How many seniors fall each year?

About 36 million US residents over 65 fall each year. About 3 million people are treated in the ER every year because of a fall injury. That’s why falls are considered an epidemic, and many institutions work on preventing them via Falls Free Initiative. The Initiative members are educating the elderly population and their families and caregivers to help reduce the risks from falls and prevent injuries.

How many seniors die from falls?

Falls are the leading cause of death from injury in older people. Around 32,000 deaths happen due to fall-related injuries. Unfortunately, fall death rates have increased 30% in the last nine years. This growth occurred across 30 states, including the District of Columbia. The fastest-growing rate was noticed in adults aged 85 and older, at about 4% per annum.

Where do seniors fall the most?

The older generation falls inside their homes mostly since they’re barely mobile and have to stay indoors. Falls that occur inside the house are likely to happen in the bedrooms, kitchens, or dining rooms. People younger than 75 often fall outside since they’re more mobile than the older generation. Fewer falls happen in the bathroom or from ladders and stools, according to fall statistics.

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